​The Orvis Game Fair and Sporting Weekend

The Orvis Game Fair and Sporting Weekend is coming up this weekend in local Millbrook at the Sandanona Shooting Grounds. The events runs Saturday and Sunday, September 16 & 17, 2017 from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm.

Sandanona brings back an era where the hunt and field are traditions that stirs deference to time long past. The grounds are the oldest shooting reserve in the country and the main lodge was built in the era of Thomas Jefferson.

Visiting in mid-autumn is the perfect time, combining the beautiful weather of the end of summer season and crispness of fall. The event itself hosts over 70 craftsman and artists, with vendor booths, activities for the kids and will also include dog training and birds and prey exhibitions and seminars and fly fishing demos. Come try your hand at fly fishing or shooting, instructors will be on hand to help.

The sporting clays shooting ground at Orvis Sandanona is one of the finest in the country and gives visitors an opportunity to practice their marksmanship in a safe environment. Sandanona was bought by Orvis several years ago and has improved both the facilities and the grounds.

For more information about the upcoming event check out http://www.orvis.com/s/orvis-game-fair-sandanona/8953

If you are coming for the weekend and need some supplies, check out these two local shops:

British Sporting Arms (13 minutes from the Inn)
3684 US-44,
Millbrook, NY 12545
http://www.bsaltd.com/

Safari Outfitters Ltd (20 minutes from the Inn)
Washington Hollow Plaza
2517 US-44, Salt Point, NY 12578
http://www.safarioutfittersltd.com/

A check out this Video of Sandanona!

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De-Stress the Omega Way!

If you need a vacation, or just time to de-stress or decompress, pair a holiday or vacation away at the Hilltop House B&B and pair it with some classes at the Omega Institute for the perfect solution to reaching the perfect OM!

Founded in 1977, Omega Institute for Holistic Studies has served as a destination for creative individuals who want to explore the arts, as well as enhance and learn leadership skills and explore personal growth.

Located on 200 acres in the heart of the Hudson Valley, the institute offers retreats, workshops and classes in it’s Rhinebeck location, as well as to others in it’s other locations around the world.

A non-profit, Omega has hosted over 23,000 people at their events, and has been at the head of innovations for natural healing and programs that explore and connect people with science to spirituality. Omega attendees come from all over the world to learn more about health, growth, personal change and development. In addition to classes, there are additional event offerings at Omega, including purification lodges, community dances, talent shows, arts and crafts fairs.

The name “Omega” came from the teachings of Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, a renowned 20th-century philosopher, who used the term “Omega Point” to describe the peak of unity and integration toward which all life is evolving.

Staff and Community Members consist of about 75 people who expand to several hundred during the main season between April and October. They help and provide assistance to the thousands of people who attend the workshops, trainings and retreats that Omega hosts.

Check out just a few of the upcoming workshops at Omega!

Body Mind and Spirit Workshops
Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction In Mind-Body Medicine
An Introduction To Yin Yoga
Celebrating Your Second Journey
Introduction To Solarplate Etching
And many more…

Health and Healing Workshops
Become Your Healthiest Self
Stretch Your Lungs With Breatheology
Transformational Cleansing™
Yoga & Mindfulness For Emotional Well-Being
The Happiness Program
And many more…

Creative Expression Workshops:
The Art Of Monoprinting
Warm Water Yoga Teacher Training
Scripting Your Soul’s Purpose
Conquer The Enemy Within
And many more…

Relationships and Family Workshops: 
Mothers & Daughters (Preteens)
Kiss Your Fights Goodbye
Prodigal Fathers, Wayward Sons
Getting The Love You Want
And many more…

Leadership and Work Workshops:
Financial Literacy & Beyond
Tools For Social Change
Centering Leadership In Presence
Micro-Resilience For Women Leaders
And many more…

Sustainable Living Workshops: 
Gifts From The Forest
Ecological Literacy Immersion Program (ELIP)
Grow Food Everywhere
Food Forestry For Your Backyard
And many more…

The Omega Institute (1/2 an hour from Hilltop House B&B)
150 Lake Drive, Rhinebeck, New York
877-944-2002
https://www.eomega.org
https://www.facebook.com/eOmega.org
https://twitter.com/omega_institute
https://www.youtube.com/user/TheOmegaInstitute
https://plus.google.com/u/0/+omegainstitute
https://www.instagram.com/omegainstitute/
https://www.pinterest.com/OmegaInstitute/

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The Sweet Smell of Maple in the Morning!

Syrup BucketsThere is almost nothing better than the smell of walking into a sugar house and smelling boiling maple sap! The best thing after smelling it, is tasting it! Drizzling real maple syrup on the delicious pancakes and waffles that you will wake up to while staying at Hilltop House!

While you are here for a visit, check out some of the local Sugar Houses! Maple Weekend and the Sugaring Festival is coming up soon, and what better souvenirs to bring back to friends and relatives (and keep a tasty stash for yourself!) than good maple syrup and other maple goodies!

Annual Maple Sugaring Festival
March 4, 2017
11 a.m.-3 p.m. Adults $15, children $10.
The Institute for American Indian Studies (About 45 minutes from the Inn)
38 Curtis Rd. Washington, CT 06793
Enjoy an afternoon celebrating the taste of Maple Sugar. Enjoy pancakes, local maple syrup, coffee and more (served from 11 a.m.-1 p.m.), and learn how Native Americans traditionally made maple syrup. Learn about the technique of collecting sap and boiling it down into syrup, and its importance to Native American culture. Connecticut Valley Siberian Husky Club’s dog sledding and mushing demonstration from 1 p.m.-3 p.m.
For more information visit http://www.iaismuseum.org/annual.shtml

Maple Syrup on Snow (Also called Sugar on Snow)

Soukup Farms (About 12 minutes from the Inn)
271 Halls Corners Rd., Dover Plains, New York
845-264-3137
Maple Weekend will be held on March 18th & 19th and March 25th & 26th from 10 to 4 each day at the sugarhouse. They will have ongoing tours and explanations of how they make maple syrup from tree to bottle. They will also be offering samples of all four grades of their maple syrup and will have it for sales as well!
https://www.facebook.com/events/428317390833536/

Soukup Farms is a third generation family farm, producing and selling pure New York Maple Syrup. It was started as a hobby in the early 1950’s and expanded to 800 taps in the 1990’s and today has more than 2,000 taps.
http://www.soukupfarms.com
https://www.facebook.com/SoukupFarms

Crown Maple (About 20 minutes from the Inn)
47 McCourt Road, Dover Plains NY 12522
845-877-0640
Winter Hours of Operation: Open Saturdays and Sundays: 10:00 am – 3:00 pm. Tours at 11:00 am and 1:00 pm. The Crown Maple Estate will resume regular hours of 10:00 am – 5:00 pm on Saturday March 18th.

Celebrate New York State Maple Weekends at The Crown Maple Estate. They will be featuring complimentary tastings, maple inspired lunch, tree tapping demonstrations and more! Free admission.
The Crown Maple Estate is located on 800 acres at Madava Farms in New York. All products are certified-organic.
https://www.crownmaple.com/
https://www.facebook.com/crownmaple
https://twitter.com/crownmaple
https://www.instagram.com/crownmaple/
https://www.pinterest.com/crownmaple/

Some fun facts about maple syrup:
It takes 40 to 50 gallons of tree sap to make one gallon of syrup.
A tree takes about 40 years before it’s big enough to tap
A quarter-cup of maple syrup is high in minerals
Stored properly, a sealed container of maple syrup can keep for several years
If you put a glass of water and a glass of maple sap side by side, you wouldn’t be able to tell the difference.
A gallon of maple syrup weighs 11 pounds
The sugar content of sap averages 2.5 percent; sugar content of maple syrup is at least 66 percent or more
Tapping does no permanent damage and only 10 percent of the sap is collected each year. Many maple trees have been tapped for 150 or more years.

Did you know what the different grades of maple syrup mean and what’s best used for?
• Light Amber or Fancy Grade has a mild maple taste and is made early in the season. This is considered best for fine maple candy.
• Medium Amber has a little more maple flavor and is made about mid-season.
• Dark Amber, although slightly darker and with a stronger maple flavor, is fast becoming a favored table syrup.

There are many additional sugar house around the Hudson Valley in NY and Litchfield County in CT, to find out more information please visit
http://www.upperhudsonmaple.com, http://www.nysmaple.com/ and http://www.ctmaple.org

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A Fun and Informational Place to Visit, Institute for American Indian Studies

Native American  Tepee

Institute for American Indian Studies (About 40 minutes from the Inn)
38 Curtis Road
Washington, CT 06793
860-868-0518
http://www.iaismuseum.org
https://www.facebook.com/IAISMusem

Hours:
10:00 am to 5:00 pm Monday through Saturday
12:00 pm to 5:00 pm Sunday
(last admission at 4:30)
In the case of inclement weather please call the museum for hours of operation.
Admission Fees: $8.00 Adults, $6.00 Senior Citizens, $5.00 Children (3-12 years)
Free for Members and Free for active U.S. service members
Located in Washington, Connecticut, the Institute for American Indian Studies (IAIS) – formerly the American Indian Archaeological Institute (AIAI) was started in 1975, and is located in the midst of 15 acres of woodlands and trails. The Museum Shop has a wide array of Native American gifts and crafts from across North America. The Institute has created a Simulated Archaeological Site, Three Sisters and Healing Plants Gardens, as well as a replicated 16th century Algonkian Village. The village is based upon traditional knowledge and archaeological research and is built from local natural materials. Self-guided trails let visitors explore the world of Woodland Indian peoples.

Over the years the Institute has surveyed or excavated over 500 sites, including a 10,000-year-old camp site, the earliest known archaeological site in Connecticut. In addition to special events and workshops, the Institute also has an Education Department, dedicated to developing programs for students of all ages. Schools from throughout the region are frequent visitors to the center and families visiting the inn will find the Institute a wealth of information and activities at any time of year, including a lecture series during the winter months.

IAIS is open year-round, seven days a week (except major U.S. holidays) offering 4 exhibit galleries, a Children’s Discovery Room, replicated outdoor 16th century Algonkian village, the Four Directions Gift Shop plus outdoor gardens and trails along our 15 acres of woodland landscape.

Come explore the past, engage with the present, and embrace Mother Earth at the Institute for American Indian Studies. Walk in the footsteps of Native Americans past and present and experience Life in the Woodlands!

IAIS December Events:
Winter Indian Arts & Crafts Market
Sat Dec 10th 12:00 pm – Sun 11th 5:00 pm
Weekends of December 3 & 4, 10 & 11
Shop for one-of-a-kind holiday gifts from our local Native American crafters, jewelers, and artists at the Winter Indian Arts & Craft Market! Take advantage of this time to meet and buy directly from the artists while learning about contemporary Native American art and cultures. Stop by to purchase gourds, pottery, jewelry, rattles, artwork, flutes and more! Feature artists include: Jeff & Judy Kalin of Primitive Technologies Inc., Allan Madahbee, Janis Us, Vera Longtoe Sheehan and more. Hours: 10-4 on Saturdays, 12-4 on Sundays.

Artifact Identification Day
Sun Dec 11th 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Join the conversation as Director of Research & Collections, Lucianne Lavin, Ph.D., identifies and provides interesting commentary about your local stone objects and Native American cultural items. While we can’t appraise or speculate about the value of an object, we can certainly talk about who, what, when, where and how of your mystery items! Included in regular museum admission of: $8 Adults; $6 Seniors; $5 Children; IAIS Members Free

Native American Pots

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